Arundhati Roy
Arundhati Roy is an Indian novelist who won the Booker Prize in 1997 for her novel, The God of Small Things. She has also written two screenplays and several collections of essays. She is a figure-head of the anti-globalization/alter-globalization movement and a vehement critic of neo-imperialism. Roy has devoted herself mainly to nonfiction and politics, publishing two more collections of essays, as well as working for social causes.
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Although I do not believe that awards are a measure of the work we do, I would like to add the National Award for the Best Screenplay that I won in 1989 to the growing pile of returned awards. Also, I want to make it clear that I am not returning this award because I […]

The new book, ‘Capitalism: A Ghost Story,’ explores the blurred connection between corporations and the foundations they endow. The following is an excerpt from Arundhati Roy’s new book, Capitalism: A Ghost Story,  (Haymarket Books, 2014).  Reprinted here with permission. What follows in this essay might appear to some to be a somewhat harsh critique. On the other hand, […]

“The U.S. is supporting al-Qaeda militias all over this region and pretending that it’s fighting Islam. So we are in a situation of—it is psychopathic.” “We are being given lessons in morality [by world leaders] while tens of thousands are being killed, while whole countries are shattered, while whole civilizations are driven back decades, if not centuries,” Roy says. “And everything continues as normal.” … March 19th marks the 10th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq. According to a new report by Brown University, a decade of war led to the deaths of roughly 134,000 Iraqi civilians and potentially contributed to the deaths of many hundreds of thousands more. According to the report, the Iraq war has cost the U.S. more than $2 trillion, including half-a-trillion dollars in benefits owed to veterans. The report says the war has devastated rather than helped Iraq, spurring militant violence, setting back women’s rights and hurting the healthcare system. Most of the more than $200 billion supposedly set aside for reconstruction in Iraq was actually used for security or lost amid rampant fraud and waste. Many in Iraq continue to suffer the consequences of the invasion. This is Basma Najem, whose husband was shot dead by U.S. forces in Basra in 2011.

Rockefeller to Mandela, Vedanta to Anna Hazare…. How long can the cardinals of corporate gospel buy up our protests? The corporate or Foundation-endowed NGOs are global finance’s way of buying into resistance movements, literally like shareholders buy shares in companies, and then try to control them from within. They sit like nodes on the central […]